Health

Strength Training Lowers Blood Pressure, According To Research On Hypertension

  • Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a common condition that, if left untreated, can cause serious issues.
  • High blood pressure management might involve using medications and lifestyle adjustments.
  • The management of high blood pressure may benefit from strength training, according to data from a systematic review and meta-analysis. Yet, factors like intensity level and duration affect how successful it is.
Individuals who have hypertension or high blood pressure are susceptible to some long-term problems. Blood pressure can be lowered and a person’s risk of problems can be decreased with early management. The greatest strategies for modifying one’s lifestyle to lower blood pressure are constantly being researched. How strength training affects blood pressure is one topic of interest. Strength training has been shown to significantly lower blood pressure levels, according to a recent systematic review and meta-analysis (Reliable Source).
 
Researchers found that strength training appears to be most useful when it entails working out at least twice per week for at least two months at a moderate to strenuous level.
 

Therapies For High Blood Pressure

The heart rate The amount of force the heart expands to pump blood throughout the body is measured by a trusted source. The force blood applies to blood vessel walls as the heart contracts are known as systolic blood pressure. When the heart relaxes, the blood pressure in the diastole is the force.
 
Blood pressure must maintain a healthy range. Serious problems from high blood pressure can include kidney failure, heart attack, or stroke. Dr. John Higgins, a sports cardiologist from UTHealth Houston and the non-author of, study’s stated to Medical News Today: Inadequate management of hypertension, a significant cardiac risk factor, can result in early coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral arterial disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. Increased morbidity and death are related to all of these disorders.
 
controlling high blood pressure Trusted Source entails making lifestyle changes and taking medication. Losing weight, giving up smoking, and exercising are a few examples of lifestyle changes. Individualized treatment programs for people with high blood pressure can be created in collaboration with their doctors.
 
Dr. Rohini Manaktala, a cardiologist and non-study author, told MNT that following a healthy lifestyle with regular physical activity, maintaining a healthy weight, eating alcohol in moderation, and giving up smoking are all effective approaches to lower blood pressure.
 

Strength Training as a Way to Control Hypertension

In this systematic review and meta-analysis, researchers investigated the effects of strength training on high blood pressure levels by reviewing several papers. Via several databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the World Health Organization, they discovered studies. Fourteen randomized controlled studies that satisfied inclusion requirements were included in their study.
 
253 hypertensive people in all were included in the study and analysis. Participants were just under sixty years old on average. We used randomized clinical studies that used strength training as a treatment for arterial hypertension in hypertensive individuals, said Giovana Rampazzo Teixeira, Ph.D., of the Department of Physical Education at UNESP – So Paulo State University.
 
Researchers discovered that the following criteria were utilized by participants to determine whether strength training was most beneficial in lowering blood pressure: At least twice a week, individuals engaged in strength exercises that ranged from moderate to strenuous intensity.
 
Researchers discovered that participant age had a small impact on effectiveness. Dr. Teixeira highlighted to MNT that people under 59 years old experienced a more notable drop in blood pressure during the physical training phase. Individuals aged between 60 and 79 years had a smaller effect but with a significant difference. Therefore, we emphasize that indeed the senior can profit from strength training.
 
The results of the study show that strength training lowers blood pressure and may clarify how to use strength training in therapeutic settings. Professionals who encounter hypertensive patients in clinical practice or even daily at the gym will be able to use strength training as a treatment for arterial hypertension, understanding what the necessary variables are to be attained and constantly keeping in mind the aims of that subject.
 

Clinical Ramifications and Data Limitations

This analysis and assessment do have some restrictions. First, research involving the use of blood pressure-lowering drugs was not disregarded. This fact might have affected how their analysis turned out. Second, while multiple control groups were employed in the studies that were included, the researchers only paid attention to the blood pressure readings of participants who had high blood pressure. The ability of researchers to compare how strength training would benefit men and women differently was also constrained. Experts also point out that there may be publication bias in the research that is currently available.
 
Dr. Manaktala made the following assumptions about the application of strength training in the management of high blood pressure in light of the study’s findings: An individual’s regular routine can readily include strength training. The most crucial factor is constancy. A decent first exercise method to lower blood pressure would be a moderate to strenuous workout, 2 to 3 times per week.
 
Lifting weights, climbing stairs, cycling, dancing, and performing push-ups, sit-ups, and squats are a few examples of strength training exercises. After eight weeks, blood pressure-lowering effects would be noticeable. But, long-term strength training that is consistently practiced might be advantageous. To develop stamina and endurance, it’s crucial to begin slowly and build up.
 
It’s also crucial to remember that each person’s use of strength training may seem different. To perform a strength training program properly, people might ask doctors and other experts for assistance. Dr. Higgins stated that it is wise to consult with medical specialists before beginning a strength training program to ensure that it is safe to do so and to get their advice on the appropriate level of intensity.
 

Conclusion

The management of high blood pressure may benefit from strength training, according to a recent systematic review and meta-analysis. The study found that strength training appears to be most useful when it entails working out at least twice per week for at least two months at a moderate to strenuous level. The researchers reviewed 14 randomized controlled studies that used strength training as a treatment for arterial hypertension in hypertensive individuals and found that participant age had a small impact on effectiveness, with people under 59 years old experiencing a more notable drop in blood pressure during the physical training phase, and individuals aged between 60 and 79 years had a smaller effect but with a significant difference. 
 
However, the study had some limitations, including that research involving the use of blood pressure-lowering drugs was not disregarded, and the ability of researchers to compare how strength training would benefit men and women differently was also constrained. Therefore, while strength training is a promising approach to lowering blood pressure, it is important to consult with medical specialists before beginning a strength training program to ensure that it is safe to do so and to get their advice on the appropriate level of intensity.

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